Tate Williams

The Week in Science Funding: Lions, Coding and Economic Catastrophe

Tate Williams June 30, 2014
African_lions_in_hunting

A digest of science and environment news, originally published on Inside Philanthropy. This week, five math rock stars, a school with lions in its backyard, and an economic red alert about climate change.

I blog about the latest in funding for research, science education, and the environment, as science editor at the news site Inside Philanthropy. Here I post the occasional roundup of highlights from that coverage. Inside Philanthropy is a subscription-based site, but visitors get a few freebies. Here’s what happened in the past week (or so).


The New Prize That Wants to Turn Science and Math Whizzes Into Rock Stars “Tao and Lurie, the youngest recipients, were thrown for a loop when they found out they had won. Lurie thought maybe Yuri Milner wanted his advice on the next winner. Tao tried to talk Milner out of his decision, thinking he hadn’t done enough.”

Where Is Google’s Big Money for Girls Coding Headed? “There were mocktails and dancing, Mindy Kaling and Chelsea Clinton. But now that the DJs have gone home and Google’s $50 million initiative to get girls coding has launched, who’s doing the work? And where’s all that money going?”

What’s Next for the Dream Team of Donors Behind the Latest Climate Alert? “We’ve heard several dire warnings about the effects of climate change, mostly from scientists and government agencies, and mostly yielding disappointing response. The latest report is a giant red alert for the sake of the country’s economy.”

How Annenberg Helped Move an African School out of a Wildlife Corridor “Manyara Ranch was established as a cattle ranch in colonial Tanzania, but over 20 years, it fell into disrepair. And yet, a school on the premises continued to be one of the best in the country. Aside from the old facilities, it did have one other problem: lions and other large animals would wander through the schoolyard.”

Image: African lions hunting, by Gary M. Stolz, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

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